Getting Paid

Getting Paid

I recently made a short presentation at Experts 4 Entrepreneurs about making sure customers pay what they owe. I had a lot of fun with it and thought it might be worthwhile to share here. I’ve embedded the PowerPoint slides below, but slides to my presentations often don’t tell the whole story, so here’s a little detail.

The presentation starts with an illustration about my not-so-pleasant experiences donating blood. (Apparently, my body needs all its blood.) How is that relevant to making sure you get paid? Because cash is a business’s life-blood. When customers don’t pay their invoices, they starve a business of a critical resource that it needs to stay healthy.

Continue Reading

Why You Should Review Your Important Contracts Before You Sell Your Business

caution

A company’s key contracts represent a valuable business asset. Thus, it’s crucial that the contracts remain in force as a business changes hands from the seller to the buyer when the business is sold.

As I’ve written elsewhere on this blog, the sale of a small business is usually structured as either an equity sale or an asset sale. In an equity sale, the buyer purchases the equity from the owner(s) of the company being sold (commonly referred to as the target company) — stock in the case of a corporation and membership interests in the case of a limited liability company. The business is transferred to the new owners, corporate or limited liability company entity and all, and the target becomes a wholly-owned subsidiary of the buyer. There is no change in the status of the target entity itself, and its contracts, assets, and liabilities remain with the entity.

Continue Reading

Don’t Buy a Business Without Looking Under the Hood

looking under the hood

Before you buy a business be sure you’ve done your due diligence. Even in the days of Carfax, you wouldn’t buy a used car without looking under the hood to make sure the car’s in good condition. You’d probably also take it to a mechanic to have it examined by an expert. If you’d do this for a car purchase, why would you making a life-changing investment without making sure the business you’re buying is in good condition?

If you’re smart, you won’t.

You’ve probably heard the phrase caveat emptor — “buyer beware.” It means that it’s the buyer’s responsibility — not the seller’s — to ferret out issues that could affect whether the buyer wants to go through with the deal. The onus is on the buyer to ask questions and challenge assumptions.

Continue Reading